Brexit Agreement Irish Border

The Brexit Agreement Irish Border: What You Need to Know

The issue of the Irish border has been one of the most contentious and complex topics of discussion in the Brexit negotiations. The Irish border has long been a point of contention between the UK and Ireland, with the Good Friday Agreement of 1998 aiming to bring an end to decades of conflict between the two nations.

But with Brexit looming, the issue of the Irish border has resurfaced, with fears that a hard border could rekindle tensions and violence in the region. The negotiations have been long and difficult, but a Brexit agreement has been reached regarding the Irish border. Here`s what you need to know:

1. The Backstop

It is undeniable that one of the biggest sticking points in the Brexit negotiations has been the issue of the Irish border. The UK has repeatedly stated that it wants to avoid a hard border with the Republic of Ireland, while the EU has insisted that it will not allow a porous border between the EU and the UK.

As a result, the backstop was introduced. The backstop is essentially an insurance policy that would come into effect if no other solution is found to ensure an open border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. It would mean that Northern Ireland would remain in the EU customs union and single market, while the rest of the UK would not.

2. The DUP`s Role

The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) of Northern Ireland has played a significant role in the negotiations regarding the Irish border. The party has consistently opposed any solution that would separate Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK, and has threatened to withdraw its support for the government if a backstop that would lead to such a separation were to be introduced.

Ultimately, however, the UK government reached an agreement with the EU that included a backstop that would see Northern Ireland aligned with the EU customs union and single market. This has caused significant tension within the government and the DUP, with some members of the party stating that they will not support the agreement in Parliament.

3. Impact on Trade

The agreement regarding the Irish border has significant implications for trade between the UK and the EU. Northern Ireland would remain in the EU customs union and single market, meaning that goods moving between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland would not need to be subject to border checks or customs duties.

However, this would create a border in the Irish Sea between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK. Goods moving between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK would need to be subject to checks and customs duties, which could create significant trade barriers and have negative impacts on businesses.

In Conclusion

The Brexit agreement regarding the Irish border is a complex and contentious issue, with significant implications for trade, the Good Friday Agreement, and the future of the UK. While the backstop has been introduced as an insurance policy to ensure an open border, it remains a controversial solution that has caused significant tension within the UK government and the DUP. Only time will tell how this issue will ultimately be resolved.

tr_TRTurkish